I really hate the NPCs in the Battle Chateau they are the epitome of all that is wrong with Kalos

zweilous has a really shitty moveset oh the things i do for dex completion

quasi-normalcy:

Listening to libertarians talk about how sophisticated and reasonable their ideology is is listening to a guy boast about how well-read he is when his library consists exclusively of Star Wars Expanded Universe novels.

thestraggletag:

egobus:

I want a movie about greek gods where hades isn’t the antagonist

By all accounts the antagonist in every Greek Gods movie should be Zeus’s dick. Nothing else causes as much murder and mayhem.

canonicalmomentum:

mediocre-latinist:

canonicalmomentum:

mediocre-latinist:

I just opened up a rom of sapphire after getting used to gen 6 graphics and ow my eyes

I actually kind of miss the crisp pixelly aesthetic of Gen III quite a lot? The size of the screen is hard to get used to when going back, but it still has a lot of appeal to me and I’m going to kind of miss it in ORAS.

???…crisp pixelly aesthetic…???

it’s a bad way of saying it’s pixel art instead of 3D stuff I guess sorry what am I even talking about

oh okay it’s just that playing it again makes me feel like i am running around (literally running) with my glasses off and it’s slightly disorienting. i could get used to it if i spent a few hours playing it.

I will say this for ORAS: the whole area around the lava mountain is going to be epic. as will the routes to and from fortree city. so epic.

canonicalmomentum:

mediocre-latinist:

I just opened up a rom of sapphire after getting used to gen 6 graphics and ow my eyes

I actually kind of miss the crisp pixelly aesthetic of Gen III quite a lot? The size of the screen is hard to get used to when going back, but it still has a lot of appeal to me and I’m going to kind of miss it in ORAS.

???…crisp pixelly aesthetic…???

I just opened up a rom of sapphire after getting used to gen 6 graphics and ow my eyes

laughhard:

In a video game there would definitely be something hidden behind this wall

laughhard:

In a video game there would definitely be something hidden behind this wall

"As we launch this initiative, we are making bold promise.
It is a promise — to today’s kindergartners all the way through to our high school seniors:
You now have the opportunity to attend two years of community or technical college completely tuition-free when you graduate from high school."

felonyvandyke:

i want trans kids to be safe so badly.

hadrianic:

arachnomatic:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

There’s a notorious corner (or possibly the doorway before it) where all the art teachers just stop and stare blankly for a while before going on with our day.

i think about this doorway effect a lot, and something i wonder: does switching to a new tab in a browser have a similar effect? because that happens to me a lot, where i switch to a tab in order to search for something or what-have-you, but completely forgot what i was doing 
does anyone know a little more about this? 

Yeah, I think switching tabs can trigger the doorway effect, because you’re basically leaving a space and entering a new one. I think most people who grew up with computers think of webpages as being psychologically like a physical space. (Though it seems like at least some older people consider it to be just so many papers.)

hadrianic:

arachnomatic:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

There’s a notorious corner (or possibly the doorway before it) where all the art teachers just stop and stare blankly for a while before going on with our day.

i think about this doorway effect a lot, and something i wonder: does switching to a new tab in a browser have a similar effect? because that happens to me a lot, where i switch to a tab in order to search for something or what-have-you, but completely forgot what i was doing 

does anyone know a little more about this? 

Yeah, I think switching tabs can trigger the doorway effect, because you’re basically leaving a space and entering a new one. I think most people who grew up with computers think of webpages as being psychologically like a physical space. (Though it seems like at least some older people consider it to be just so many papers.)

mediocre-latinist:

I don’t want to have kids cause I’m afraid they’ll rebel and become heterosexual republicans

You know how you always have like two posts that pop up every so often and get half a dozen notes then disappear for a couple months and repeat the cycle?